28440194Title: In the Company of Women: Inspiration and Advice from over 100 Makers, Artists, and Entrepreneurs
Author: Grace Bonney
Pages: 368
Year: 2016
Publisher: Artisan (Workman)
Time taken to read: 8 months, 10 days
Rating: 5/5

Goodreads synopsisAcross the globe, women are embracing the entrepreneurial spirit and starting creative businesses. In the Company of Women profiles over 100 of these influential and creative women from all ages, races, backgrounds, and industries. Chock-full of practical, inspirational advice for those looking to forge their own paths, these interviews detail the keys to success (for example, going with your gut; maintaining meaningful and lasting relationships), highlight the importance of everyday rituals (meditating; creating a daily to-do list), and dispense advice for the next generation of women entrepreneurs and makers (stay true to what you believe in; have patience). The book is rounded out with hundreds of lush, original photographs of the women in their work spaces.

So, I have a wonderful cousin (who owns a really cool greeting card company that you should totally check out) who took me to this event last fall where Grace Bonney and a few of the people she interviewed for this book talked about what success means to them and how they’ve come to create and grow these successful creative businesses, and it was really neat and a great example of why I love living in New York, because there are all these cool, creative things happening all the time, and I was lucky enough to be a part of this one. It’s also really cool to know that I’m living among so many of the women interviewed in the book who live in New York, and that inspires me to try to rise to be one of them in a way.

In the Company of Women is a beautiful book, and I mean that very literally–the photos of the women and their workspaces are so colorful and amazing, and the layout of the text and various quotes makes this a really aesthetically pleasing book. But of course, the words are beautiful too. Every page is filled with inspiration, and though I have never felt the urge to start a business exactly, it made me think of my writing goals as a sort of business, and once I made that connection, I was able to relate to each interview and use the advice and inspiration to strive to be more creative and productive with my writing. I always have to remind myself that no one else will make me a writer. I have to make myself a writer by doing it. And that’s what all these women did too. They made themselves the thing they wanted to be because nobody else could do it for them.

Reading about these strong, powerful, intelligent women has been a wonderful experience. I want to say that it’s been motivational and inspirational, but I don’t feel like I’ve really earned the right to say that since I haven’t been doing much of my own creative work over the eight months that I’ve been flipping through this book. I’ve been working hard but not on the project that I would consider to be my “business”. So I will say that I hope that, along with my internship being over and therefore having a lot more free time, finishing this book will give me the motivation and inspiration to be creative and hard-working just like these fantastic role models.

I was going to say that I think all women who want to work in a creative field should read this book. Then I was going to say that all women should read this book. Then I realized that really everyone should read this book. Inspirational women don’t do what they do to inspire only women. Men should be inspired by them as well. We can all draw strength from female power!

22608764Title: How It Ends
Author: Catherine Lo
Pages: 304
Year: 2016
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Books for Young Readers
Time taken to read: 4 days
Rating: 4/5

Goodreads synopsisThere are two sides to every story. It’s friends-at-first-sight for Jessie and Annie, proving the old adage that opposites attract. Shy, anxious Jessie would give anything to have Annie’s beauty and confidence. And Annie thinks Jessie has the perfect life, with her close-knit family and killer grades. They’re BFFs…until suddenly they’re not. Told through alternating points of view, How It Ends is a wildly fast but deeply moving read about a friendship in crisis. Set against a tumultuous sophomore year of bullying, boys and backstabbing, the novel shows what can happen when friends choose assumptions and fear over each other.

It’s really important to me that there are more friendship stories in the world. I don’t care for YA romance whatsoever, so finding How It Ends was exciting for me. It’s exactly the type of thing I want to work to get on bookshelves in my career in publishing or writing or just living life as a person who likes books and regularly does things related to them. Anyway, there were a lot of things I liked about this book and a lot of things I didn’t like. So let’s get into it.

I normally don’t like books told in alternating perspectives, but I thought this one was a little unique because it sort of made me feel like the two main characters Jessie and Annie were actually talking to me. It was like I was friends with both of them and they were each coming to me at different times to complain about the other one, and I was happy to listen. I wish I could have given them some advice, but it would have been hard because I really understood both of their sides. I wanted Annie to see how much pain Jessie was in, and I wanted Jessie to be the bigger person and just try to see if being nice to Courtney would make things easier for everyone. I wanted to tell Jessie to be strong and let Courtney’s comments roll right off her back. But I also know it’s not that easy. I wanted to help them all compromise. I identified most strongly with Jessie, which led to a deep understanding of her side of things but also a frustration with her very similar to the frustration I have with myself. All that made this book very complicated for me, which is something I really value in a book. I like a book that makes me think and reflect on my own circumstances.

However, I didn’t fully buy into their friendship. I thought it developed too quickly and too randomly. A common thing we say in publishing is that the relationship wasn’t earned. Additionally, I thought Scott was intensely boring. I didn’t see why Annie or Jessie would be interested in him. The thing is, I’m sure there are reasons that the author had, but they weren’t on the page. I believe that there are things about all the characters that would draw them to each other, but my guess is that the author thought she wrote those things when she actually didn’t. My final issue with the book is a bit of a spoiler, so just skip to the last paragraph if you haven’t read this yet. Anyway, this may sound a little harsh, but the whole pregnancy thing at the end felt a little cheap. Teen pregnancy is a big thing, and I feel that if an author wants to address it, they have to fully address it. As in, make it your plot, not your ending. It came out of nowhere, and it felt a little bit like a puzzle piece that didn’t fit. While I want teen pregnancy to be talked about because it’s important to educate girls and to let them know that they’re not alone, I want the issue to be addressed with care and with the author’s whole heart behind it, devoted to helping girls understand the issue so they can make the best choices for them.

Those are my thoughts. I’m glad books like this are being written. I hope to see them continue to be improved upon as more and more people read and write and learn. I hope you all are enjoying the hot weather and staying cool in your local library, as I am doing right now! (P.S. If any New York City readers want to hang out with me in the Rose room at the library in Bryant Park, it’s my new favorite spot!)

31247023Title: Lucky Broken Girl
Author: Ruth Behar
Pages: 256
Year: 2017
Publisher: Nancy Paulsen (Penguin)
Time taken to read: 3 days
Rating: 4/5

Goodreads synopsisBased on the author’s childhood in the 1960s, a young Cuban-Jewish immigrant girl is adjusting to her new life in New York City when her American dream is suddenly derailed. Ruthie Mizrahi and her family recently emigrated from Castro’s Cuba to New York City. Just when she’s finally beginning to gain confidence in her mastery of English and enjoying her reign as her neighborhood’s hopscotch queen, a horrific car accident leaves her in a body cast and confined her to her bed for a long recovery. As Ruthie’s world shrinks because of her inability to move, her powers of observation and her heart grow larger. She comes to understand how fragile life is, how vulnerable we all are as human beings, and how friends, neighbors, and the power of the arts can sweeten even the worst of times.

I think it’s so neat that this is a sort of fictionalization of the author’s own experience. In my time interning at literary agencies, I have read a lot of proposals for memoirs that people have written or planned to write that I think would work so much better as fiction, and this is a great example of that. It struck me how engaged I felt in the story where the main character could not leave her bed. And I really felt all the things that she felt. I was inspired by Chicho who shows her how to paint and teaches her about Frida Kahlo, and I was kind of annoyed by that snooty little Belgian girl that I knew was not being snooty on purpose, but sheesh, did she really need to wave her perfection in our faces? (Yes, I do get intimidated by ten-year-olds, okay?) I learned a lot about a lot of different cultures from this book, which is a great thing especially in a middle grade book. I only took my rating down to four stars because there was this little background issue where Ruthie’s mother was clearly being at least mildly psychologically abused by Ruthie’s father, but the author didn’t go anywhere with that. And maybe it never escalated to much in their real life, but I wanted some kind of progression. Ruthie’s mother didn’t necessarily have to leave him, but I at least wanted her to start to be able to acknowledge what was happening. But overall, I think this is a great book to give to any middle-school-aged people you know, as well as a good one to read yourself.

Speaking of interning, today is my last day at Writers House! I didn’t think I would feel so sad, but I do, and I will miss this place a lot. But I will always be reading and reviewing books, even if it’s just actual published books for a while. Who knows what I’ll be doing next! Happy reading, friends.

26118005Title: My Best Friend’s Exorcism
Author: Grady Hendrix
Pages: 336
Year: 2016
Publisher: Quirk Books
Time taken to read: 1 week
Rating: 5/5

Goodreads synopsis: Abby and Gretchen have been best friends since fifth grade, when they bonded over a shared love of E.T., roller-skating parties, and scratch-and-sniff stickers. But when they arrive at high school, things change. Gretchen begins to act…different. And as the strange coincidences and bizarre behavior start to pile up, Abby realizes there’s only one possible explanation: Gretchen, her favorite person in the world, has a demon living inside her. And Abby is not about to let anyone or anything come between her and her best friend. With help from some unlikely allies, Abby embarks on a quest to save Gretchen. But is their friendship powerful enough to beat the devil?

I’m not even sure where to start with this one. This book thrilled me. The day I finished it, I was reading it on the subway holding my breath, so desperate to get to the end and find out if everyone was going to be okay or not. I didn’t realize how literal the title of this book is, and let me tell you, her best friend’s exorcism is intense. The whole book is intense. There were a few moments more towards the end that really shocked me, and I have to talk about it a little bit, so please skip to the next paragraph if you haven’t read this book and don’t want any spoilers…. Okay, the best part in my opinion is when Gretchen kills her dog. Like, all the pieces of what she’s doing to her friends are slowly coming together, and by this point you realize she’s become totally evil, but like, you really don’t know until she kills her freaking dog. Like even when you realize she’s setting things up to kill her dog, you don’t believe she’s really gonna do it, and I don’t even like dogs that much (SORRY) but I was really hoping she wasn’t gonna do it, but then she DID and I was like, holy moly. So then when the exorcism was happening I was FREAKING out because I was like, oh my god, what if she’s not possessed, what if she’s just evil, because the exorcist can’t get it out, and my stomach was in knots as I was tearing through the pages like OH MY GOD WHAT IS GOING TO HAPPEN and then it happened and then I could breathe again, and it was wild.

Anyway, I was particularly struck by how well the main characters are developed. There are four best friends around which this story is centered, and they are all very unique characters with distinct voices. And their distinct voices felt so real. Everything about their dialogue and Abby’s inner monologue sounded so authentic, so much that I was really shocked when I realized this was written by a man, and I wonder how he learned to write teenage girls so well. So I will have to read his other book, I think, and see if that one is just as good.

The only thing I didn’t like was the epilogue that shows, like, the entire rest of their lives. I totally did not need that. I didn’t really want to think of these kids as adults. I just wanted to see this moment in their lives. But overall it was fantastic, and I am definitely adding it to my list of favorites. And I will be recommending it to everyone who starts a conversation with me for, like, the next month. Also, bonus points for a dope cover. Anyway, My Best Friend’s Exorcism is horrifyingly wonderful, so please read it and then come back and tell me that you also loved it.

28503941Title: Wonder Women: 25 Innovators, Inventors, and Trailblazers Who Changed History
Author: Sam Maggs (Illustrator: Sophia Foster-Dimino)
Pages: 240
Year: 2016
Publisher: Quirk Books
Time taken to read: 9 days
Rating: 4/5

Goodreads synopsisSmart women have always been able to achieve amazing things, even when the odds were stacked against them. In Wonder Women, author Sam Maggs tells the stories of the brilliant, brainy, and totally rad women in history who broke barriers as scientists, engineers, mathematicians, adventurers, and inventors, complete with portraits by Google doodler Sophia Foster-Dimino. Plus, interviews with real-life women in STEM careers, an extensive bibliography, and a guide to women-centric science and technology organizations—all to show the many ways the geeky girls of today can help to build the future.

Nonfiction geared towards kids/young adults is always interesting to me as someone who’s interested in education. It can be difficult to get young people to pay attention to things like this, but this book works hard to present a teen-friendly tone, complete with slang and TV references that reminded me of being in my late teens. This book actually started a bit of a fire in me because as I read about the men who took credit for women’s inventions and discoveries, I realized I recognized nearly all of the men’s names from my high school science classes and only maybe two of the women’s names, one being Amelia Earhart, whom we’ve all definitely heard of. I think I still wanted to believe that things weren’t that bad, that women have always been just as intelligent but they haven’t had the same resources, so it was pretty sad to learn that women of history still did so much despite their lack of resources and we still learn about the men who stole the credit instead. So I’m glad this book exists and that there are people working to try to make people aware of the contributions of women. I will say that though I know this book is supposed to be more about science and technology and this women are much less known for, I wish there had been a section on female writers and artists, but perhaps that’s just me being selfish, and I can see reasons for not including that.

Now back to that teen-friendly tone I mentioned–it was kind of a lot. Many of the jokes and references were truly very funny, but it started to feel a little old after the first third of the book. I think it would have had a stronger impact if the asides were just a tad more sparse. Some other reviewers thought it sounded inauthentic and like the writer was trying too hard to relate to teens, but I wouldn’t take it that far. I thought it sounded plenty authentic and natural for the writer, who originally posted some of this content on Tumblr, but I think using this type of language so much could potentially isolate kids who are not the Tumblr type and might not get a lot of the references, which is ultimately why I had to drop this a star. Still, if I am ever a teacher, this will absolutely be in my classroom. I want kids to grow up with this knowledge rather than coming to it as an adult like I did, and this book is a great resource.

25785649-1Title: The Way I Used to Be
Author: Amber Smith
Pages: 367
Year: 2016
Publisher: Margaret K. McElderry (Simon & Schuster)
Time taken to read: 30 hours
Rating: 3/5

Goodreads synopsisIn the tradition of Speak, this extraordinary debut novel shares the unforgettable story of a young woman as she struggles to find strength in the aftermath of an assault. Eden was always good at being good. Starting high school didn’t change who she was. But the night her brother’s best friend rapes her, Eden’s world capsizes. What was once simple, is now complex. What Eden once loved—who she once loved—she now hates. What she thought she knew to be true, is now lies. Nothing makes sense anymore, and she knows she’s supposed to tell someone what happened but she can’t. So she buries it instead. And she buries the way she used to be. Told in four parts—freshman, sophomore, junior, and senior year—this provocative debut reveals the deep cuts of trauma. But it also demonstrates one young woman’s strength as she navigates the disappointment and unbearable pains of adolescence, of first love and first heartbreak, of friendships broken and rebuilt, and while learning to embrace a power of survival she never knew she had hidden within her heart.

I saw The Way I Used to Be on the shelf at B&N this past Sunday, and, drawn in by the cover, I read the synopsis. I really like Speak, and I was intrigued by the comparison. So, I got it from the library first thing the next day.

I struggled to rate this book. I originally gave it four stars because I think it could accomplish what I’m assuming it means to accomplish, which is helping victims of sexual assault gather the courage to speak up. And for that reason, sure, I’m glad it exists. I also liked that it takes place over four years, because I don’t think people realize how much these events affect people years and years after they happen. At the end of Eden’s senior year, this thing still controls her life, and that is the reality of it for a lot of people. I also think the way she turns to frivolous and even potentially dangerous sex is interesting. Everyone deals with PTSD differently. Everyone finds a different coping mechanism. And Eden’s is very active and vivid, which I think works well in novel.

Yet, I felt the relationships weren’t earned. I don’t understand why Josh ever liked Eden, for example. She was never nice to him. It bothered me so much every time she flipped out on him in a way that seemed totally random to him, and sure, she doesn’t want to tell him the truth, but she doesn’t even try to reassure him that it wasn’t his fault. And I get that all of it is hard for her. I really do. But Josh was a good guy, and if Eden had questioned that goodness, if she had doubted him and even feared him, I would have understood why she treated him so poorly. But she never really did question whether or not he was genuine. She’s using him and she knows it, and while I have sympathy for her, it still isn’t right to treat someone the way she does. But even besides whether or not I agree with her actions, I had trouble believing that Josh would put up with it for so long. He was the king of the school or whatever. I’m assuming he could date nearly any girl he wanted. Why Eden? He never says why he’s so drawn to her, just that he is, and I didn’t buy it.

But again, honestly, as much as I have sympathy for her, I was absolutely exhausted by the way she treated Josh and Steve and everyone else around her. And I could see glimpses of evidence that she’s exhausting herself too, throughout the book, and those moments were great. I wanted a lot more of that. I wanted a stronger sense of her being out of control and knowing she’s out of control but not being able to rein it in no matter how much she tries and how much she knows these people don’t deserve it. But that’s not her attitude. It really bothered me how she talks about her parents. They lash out at her because she lashes out at them first in a way that’s incredibly immature and unacceptable to me no matter what you’ve been through. Her mom shouldn’t ever have slapped her, obviously, but Eden treated them like crap long before that happened. And even if Eden recognized her actions for what they were more often, the way she lashes out at good people on every page got so repetitive. I won’t spoil the ending, but I will say I was relieved by it, and it saved me from giving the book an even lower rating.

I saw a lot of reviews on Goodreads similar to mine where readers wanted to criticize Eden but felt guilty about it because of her PTSD. I think it’s important to note for me and for all of those reviewers that none of us is saying we don’t sympathize with Eden and understand that no one deals with sexual assault perfectly. I think when we talk about what Eden does that we didn’t like, we’re talking about her as a character, and I think her actions as a character start to overshadow the message the book is trying to send. If Eden was a more likable character, I wouldn’t be sitting here talking about how she’s unlikable–instead I would be talking about how much this book and others like it have the potential to change lives. But I’m not talking about that, nor are other reviewers, because this is in the way, and that’s why, while it’s really important to me to read about flawed characters, there has to be a balance, especially in instances like this.

26244587Title: Dear Amy
Author: Helen Callaghan
Pages: 343
Year: 2016
Publisher: Harper (HarperCollins)
Time taken to read: 7 weeks
Rating: 3/5

Goodreads synopsisMargot Lewis is the agony aunt for The Cambridge Examiner. Her advice column, Dear Amy, gets all kinds of letters – but none like the one she’s just received: ‘Dear Amy, I don’t know where I am. I’ve been kidnapped and am being held prisoner by a strange man. I’m afraid he’ll kill me. Please help me soon, Bethan Avery.’ Bethan Avery has been missing for nearly two decades. This is surely some cruel hoax. But as more letters arrive, they contain information that was never made public. How is this happening? Answering this question will cost Margot everything….

Firstly, Helen Callaghan’s language is absolutely exceptional. She used lovely metaphors, and her word choice is amazing in so many instances, and for that reason alone, I would read anything else she may write in the future (assuming the premise doesn’t sound awful). However, I cannot rate this very highly, and I cannot tell you why without spoiling the ending, so please just move on from this review if you haven’t read this book yet and you still want to.

Now, onto the spoilers.

I am not a psychologist or psychiatrist. I took psych 101 and my mom has a psych degree. That’s as far as my official knowledge goes. However, I am, like 99.999% sure you CANNOT push memories down so deep that when you hear your own name and go back to your childhood home and see your grandmother and all of these things that you lived with for sixteen or so years, you literally cannot recall any of it. Like, okay, I was glad that the ending wasn’t predictable, at least for me. And if you ignore the fact that this is impossible, it is a very cool twist. But I cannot ignore that fact. After I finished this book and discussed with my boyfriend (who is knowledgable about many topics and agreed with me that this is impossible), I started to think maybe that was the point, and Margot is an unreliable narrator who is still trying so hard to pretend that she’s not Bethan that she’s lying to us too. That I would have been okay with if it had been very clear. If that had been done well, I could see myself giving this a much higher rating. But also, side note, I cannot believe all the people on Goodreads saying the twist was so predictable. I don’t predict impossible things in realistic fiction. But again, if it had been clear from the beginning that Margot was hiding something from us (without making it obvious what it was), it might have been better. Some kind of red herring would have to be involved. Ooh, or maybe Bethan could have sustained intense brain damage from Chris’s violence and that (partially combined with psychological trauma, perhaps) made her forget her life. I’ve changed my mind, that would have been way better than Margot lying to us. And it would have been actually possible (I think, as I’m not a medical doctor either).

The book was also a little slow-going in the beginning, as you can see from the fact that this took me over a month to read. Then again, it’s not my typical genre, so that might be why that happened. Who knows.