Little Princes by Conor Grennan

11250847Title: Little Princes: One Man’s Promise to Bring Home the Lost Children of Nepal
Author: Conor Grennan
Pages: 320
Year: 2010
Publisher: William Morrow Paperbacks (HarperCollins)
Time taken to read: 2 weeks, 4 days
Rating: 5/5

Goodreads synopsisIn search of adventure, twenty-nine-year-old Conor Grennan embarked on a yearlong journey around the globe, beginning with a three-month stint volunteering at an orphanage in civil war-torn Nepal. But a shocking truth would forever change his life: these rambunctious, resilient children were not orphans at all but had been taken from their families by child traffickers who falsely promised to keep them safe from war before abandoning them in the teeming chaos of Kathmandu. For Conor, what started as a footloose ramble became a dangerous, dedicated mission to unite youngsters he had grown to love with the parents they had been stolen from—a breathtaking adventure, as Conor risked everything in the treacherous Nepalese mountains to bring the children home.

This is one of those books that I wished would never end.

The literary agent I used to work for, Trena, represents Conor, and she encouraged me to read this many times before I finally picked it up. And boy did I pick it up. I savored every word and tried to draw it out as much as possible because I wanted to read about the children of Nepal every day for the rest of my life. This book had me nearly in tears on the subway regularly over the last two weeks, at the same time that it had me laughing out loud. The kids sound so wonderful–they have such a fantastic sense of humor, especially Jagrit. I love the way they all make fun of Conor. And when the littlest girl who was so traumatized finally laughs for the first time, I completely broke. And when I got to the middle of the book where there were pictures…goodness, it really hit me then that these kids are real and they’re still out there, living and breathing, and I want to meet them. I’m, like, holding myself back from asking Trena to call up Conor and see if I can go to Nepal and help out somehow. Because I know that’s insane, and also the kids are nearly adults now, but there are probably more little ones, and I want to have this amazing connection that he had with them.

As for the actual writing–Conor’s voice is strong, and he really brings Nepal to life. I get the sense that if I read something else by him, I would know it was his writing. I didn’t care so much for the segments about Liz, but I was really moved by the part when he buys a bible as a means to get closer to her, and Farid, who is becoming a Buddhist, says, “We both saw that light, I think. We just saw different things in the light.” I’m not a religious person, and for me to try find one would be inauthentic, but everybody believes in something, even if that something is nothing, and I like to think that all those somethings are really all the same something. I don’t think that’s really what Farid meant, but I think it’s related. Either way, I like books that spark those thought processes in me.

I learned a lot from this book, and I’ve enjoyed sharing the story of these children with anyone I can get to listen (mostly my coworkers, ha). I definitely recommend this one. I’m also very excited to say that this is my 100th book review! Glad it landed on a good one. Happy reading, friends.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: