Wonder Women by Sam Maggs

28503941Title: Wonder Women: 25 Innovators, Inventors, and Trailblazers Who Changed History
Author: Sam Maggs (Illustrator: Sophia Foster-Dimino)
Pages: 240
Year: 2016
Publisher: Quirk Books
Time taken to read: 9 days
Rating: 4/5

Goodreads synopsisSmart women have always been able to achieve amazing things, even when the odds were stacked against them. In Wonder Women, author Sam Maggs tells the stories of the brilliant, brainy, and totally rad women in history who broke barriers as scientists, engineers, mathematicians, adventurers, and inventors, complete with portraits by Google doodler Sophia Foster-Dimino. Plus, interviews with real-life women in STEM careers, an extensive bibliography, and a guide to women-centric science and technology organizations—all to show the many ways the geeky girls of today can help to build the future.

Nonfiction geared towards kids/young adults is always interesting to me as someone who’s interested in education. It can be difficult to get young people to pay attention to things like this, but this book works hard to present a teen-friendly tone, complete with slang and TV references that reminded me of being in my late teens. This book actually started a bit of a fire in me because as I read about the men who took credit for women’s inventions and discoveries, I realized I recognized nearly all of the men’s names from my high school science classes and only maybe two of the women’s names, one being Amelia Earhart, whom we’ve all definitely heard of. I think I still wanted to believe that things weren’t that bad, that women have always been just as intelligent but they haven’t had the same resources, so it was pretty sad to learn that women of history still did so much despite their lack of resources and we still learn about the men who stole the credit instead. So I’m glad this book exists and that there are people working to try to make people aware of the contributions of women. I will say that though I know this book is supposed to be more about science and technology and this women are much less known for, I wish there had been a section on female writers and artists, but perhaps that’s just me being selfish, and I can see reasons for not including that.

Now back to that teen-friendly tone I mentioned–it was kind of a lot. Many of the jokes and references were truly very funny, but it started to feel a little old after the first third of the book. I think it would have had a stronger impact if the asides were just a tad more sparse. Some other reviewers thought it sounded inauthentic and like the writer was trying too hard to relate to teens, but I wouldn’t take it that far. I thought it sounded plenty authentic and natural for the writer, who originally posted some of this content on Tumblr, but I think using this type of language so much could potentially isolate kids who are not the Tumblr type and might not get a lot of the references, which is ultimately why I had to drop this a star. Still, if I am ever a teacher, this will absolutely be in my classroom. I want kids to grow up with this knowledge rather than coming to it as an adult like I did, and this book is a great resource.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: