Lucky Broken Girl by Ruth Behar

31247023Title: Lucky Broken Girl
Author: Ruth Behar
Pages: 256
Year: 2017
Publisher: Nancy Paulsen (Penguin)
Time taken to read: 3 days
Rating: 4/5

Goodreads synopsisBased on the author’s childhood in the 1960s, a young Cuban-Jewish immigrant girl is adjusting to her new life in New York City when her American dream is suddenly derailed. Ruthie Mizrahi and her family recently emigrated from Castro’s Cuba to New York City. Just when she’s finally beginning to gain confidence in her mastery of English and enjoying her reign as her neighborhood’s hopscotch queen, a horrific car accident leaves her in a body cast and confined her to her bed for a long recovery. As Ruthie’s world shrinks because of her inability to move, her powers of observation and her heart grow larger. She comes to understand how fragile life is, how vulnerable we all are as human beings, and how friends, neighbors, and the power of the arts can sweeten even the worst of times.

I think it’s so neat that this is a sort of fictionalization of the author’s own experience. In my time interning at literary agencies, I have read a lot of proposals for memoirs that people have written or planned to write that I think would work so much better as fiction, and this is a great example of that. It struck me how engaged I felt in the story where the main character could not leave her bed. And I really felt all the things that she felt. I was inspired by Chicho who shows her how to paint and teaches her about Frida Kahlo, and I was kind of annoyed by that snooty little Belgian girl that I knew was not being snooty on purpose, but sheesh, did she really need to wave her perfection in our faces? (Yes, I do get intimidated by ten-year-olds, okay?) I learned a lot about a lot of different cultures from this book, which is a great thing especially in a middle grade book. I only took my rating down to four stars because there was this little background issue where Ruthie’s mother was clearly being at least mildly psychologically abused by Ruthie’s father, but the author didn’t go anywhere with that. And maybe it never escalated to much in their real life, but I wanted some kind of progression. Ruthie’s mother didn’t necessarily have to leave him, but I at least wanted her to start to be able to acknowledge what was happening. But overall, I think this is a great book to give to any middle-school-aged people you know, as well as a good one to read yourself.

Speaking of interning, today is my last day at Writers House! I didn’t think I would feel so sad, but I do, and I will miss this place a lot. But I will always be reading and reviewing books, even if it’s just actual published books for a while. Who knows what I’ll be doing next! Happy reading, friends.

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2 comments
  1. Ten-year-olds can be pretty intimidating depending on the temperament. I just stumbled upon your blog but I look forward to reading more and best of luck in whatever you choose to do next! Brilliant review!

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